Different Types Of Cultures | Cultural Groups Examples

Last Updated on May 21, 2021 by Bob De Generio

Culture is at the heart of every society. It shapes what people do, how they behave, and even their values. The word “culture” has been defined in many different ways by different groups of people, but there are some common elements that exist in all cultures across the world. This article will go over a few different types of culture so you can learn about these aspects and develop your own understanding of this topic.

What Are The 7 Types Of Culture?

What Are The 7 Types Of Culture?

The Four Different Types Of Culture Are As Follows:

–  individualistic cultures, which prioritize the needs and goals of an individual person over those of various groups that may exist in society; this is also true for societies with a high degree of personal freedom. Examples include the United States and Canada.

– collectivistic cultures, which emphasize group membership and responsibilities to one’s family or community above some other social ties. This includes Japan, China, South Korea.

– traditional cultures typically have strong links to older generations who maintain close relationships across extended families through child-rearing practices like an intergenerational transfer (inheriting norms from parents) or co-residence (values learned by living closely together). These traditions can be passed down through an oral tradition, such as folk tales.

– the traditional cultures may be linked to a singular religion or spiritual system that governs most life practices. For example, Jewish culture is largely governed by Judaic law, and Christian culture is based on Biblical principles.

– some types of Western societies are also described as traditional – these include Scandinavian countries (particularly Denmark) which are noted for their high degree of social equality and focus on low levels of economic inequality; this type includes Switzerland with its direct democracy, large multinational companies in France like Carrefour SA; and Germany where one’s status reflects both individual accomplishments but also family ties to name just three examples.

What Are Some Elements Of Culture?

– language

– art, entertainment, and the arts   – rituals and celebrations; religious beliefs

– attitudes to work, authority, family relationships, etc.

– food (e.g., different cuisines) which might be found in various types of restaurants or delicatessens such as Indian cuisine at a Udupi restaurant chain in India where a typical dish is masala dosa served with chutney; Thai cuisine from one of Bangkok’s many roadside eateries that offer their customers tom yum soup on rice noodles alongside other dishes like chicken satay skewers dipped into peanut sauce before being eaten by hand without cutlery while reclining back onto a mat covered with foil paper for easy clean up afterward

– social organization

– population size and density, economic systems

– levels of technology use (e.g., computer usage)

– different types of government (i.e., democracy or totalitarianism) that might be found in various countries such as the United States vs North Korea; Sweden vs Saudi Arabia; Israel vs Iran

etc. etc…

Different Types Of Cultures In America

Today, different types of cultures are all around us. Whether we’re eating a taco on the streets of Los Angeles or ordering Korean barbecue from a food cart outside Yankee Stadium in New York City, it seems as if every culture has an opportunity to be expressed and consumed virtually anywhere you go. In this blog post, I’ll take some time to examine what exactly defines cultural differences.

The first thing that might come to mind when one thinks about different types of cultures is how they vary based on social organization: for example, family-oriented vs individualistic; collectivist vs competitive; hierarchical vs egalitarian; cooperative versus possessive…etc etc etc… These ideals form the backbone upon which many different cultures are built and take shape.

Cultural Groups Examples

– family oriented vs individualistic

– collectivist vs competitive

– hierarchical vs egalitarian

(etc etc)

The first thing that might come to mind when one thinks about different types of cultures is how they vary based on social organization: for example, family-oriented vs individualistic; collectivist vs competitive; hierarchical versus egalitarian; cooperative or possessive. These ideals form the backbone upon which many different cultures are built and take shape. The following paragraphs will explore a few examples of cultural groups in order to better illustrate this point.

I’ll start with the Amish who live in Pennsylvania Dutch country near Lancaster County and follow up by taking a look at the Mennonites from Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula who live in the state of Campeche.

The Amish are a group that has been living in Pennsylvania Dutch country for centuries, and who still speak German as their first language. They’re descendants of ethnic Germans from Switzerland, France, Austria, Bavaria, and other places where they were persecuted by Catholics because they didn’t believe Holy Communion should be given to infants or adults without being able to understand it. In order to preserve their faith against outside interference (and persecution), this culture has developed into a close-knit community with strong ties between family members and neighbors; these people take pride in farming on small plots of land which often produce organic crops like corn grown for livestock feed as well as flowers and herbs used both medicinally and in cooking.

– The Pennsylvania Dutch are a great example of an ethnic culture that has existed in one place for centuries, and who still speak German as their first language. They’re descendants of ethnic Germans from Switzerland, France, Austria, Bavaria, and other places where they were persecuted by Catholics because they didn’t believe Holy Communion should be given to infants or adults without being able to understand it. In order to preserve their faith against outside interference (and persecution), this culture has developed into a close-knit community with strong ties between family members and neighbors; these people take pride in farming on small plots of land which often produce organic crops like corn grown for livestock feed as well as flowers and herbs used both medicinally and in cooking.

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